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EWER
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Inventory Number
HKU.C.1964.0552
Category In English
Ceramics
Object Name
Ewer
Periods / Dynasties
Goryo dynasty (918–1392 CE) -
Materials
Stoneware with celadon glaze
No. of Items (in a Set)
2
Dimensions
W: 12 cm, H: 9 cm
Descriptions in English
Ceramics with green glazes were the only high–fired wares produced in Korea during the Goryeo dynasty, after they were introduced from China around the 10th century. The designs on this ewer were produced using a Korean technique called sanggam cheongja (‘inlaid green porcelain’), which involves etching the desired motifs onto a dry clay body and filling in the carved space with a black or white slip.

The exterior of this teapot is decorated with patterns carved with a knife, using a technique known as eumgak cheongja (‘incised celadon’), which flourished in Korea during the 12th century. Much of the symbolism used in Korean art was adapted from the Chinese decorative repertoire as a result of the close cultural ties between the two countries. Many designs used on celadon wares and other decorative objects are associated with Buddhism, Daoism or Confucianism, which at various times were supported by the ruling class and came to permeate social and religious life.

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